Mentorship Awards

Scientists are often judged by their number of papers, citations, or scientific awards but many of our greatest minds have also served the field as influential mentors to junior colleagues. For women, obtaining a strong mentor is a crucial part of advancing their careers in a male-dominated field. To highlight the invaluable colleagues who support and inspire us, we created the WiSE Mentorship Awards to honor women and men who have served as personal or professional mentors to women here at CSHL

The inaugural WiSE Mentorship Awards were announced at 2017's Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory In-house symposium, November 20, 2017 - Congratulations to the big winners were Dr. Linda Van Aelst and Dr. Sarah Diermier! They were profiled in WiSE Wednesday pieces.

 

We also would like to congratulate our honorable mentions, who are listed below alongside  some of their nominator's kind words.

Sydney Gary

Sydney has been instrumental in helping me start my research program. Sydney arranged for child care assistance so that faculty with children can attend the faculty retreat. Also, she has supported the ability of women to acquire the space they need at the lab for their research.

Jason Sheltzer

“[Jason] would stay in lab until late hours to teach me new protocols and how to analyze data. Under his guidance, I have grown from an undergrad with basic knowledge of biological mechanisms to a published scientist.”

Anne Churchland

“Anne helped me learn how to be collaborative, how to be nice while remaining assertive, and how to prioritize and manage my time. Our lab is a safe space where diversity of background and thought is celebrated, and Anne makes it so.”

Chris Vakoc

“Chris allowed me to mentor a rotation student, helped me network with pharmaceutical companies, and taught me about the hiring processes in academia. He cares about educating students in possible career paths.”

Alyson Kass-Eisler

“She’s amazing. Every time I speak with her, I feel like she solves a million problems for me no matter how busy she is. She is involved in so many aspects of the Watson School and more. Each time we have a problem, the first reaction from everyone seems to be – Ask Alyson.”

Camila dos Santos

“From the day I met her, [Camila’s] passion for science was both admirable and inspiring. She has taught me to love science at its most basic level and I am so thankful that I have had the opportunity to learn from her.”

Amanda McBrien

“[Amanda] is a marvelous leader with a keen eye for helping others reach their potential. She supported me in developing critical skills that I thought were out of my reach. She always has a listening ear when any problems arise (work related or not). She has great advice for every situation.”

About the awards:

Scientists are often judged by their number of papers, citations, or scientific awards but many of our greatest minds have also served the field as influential mentors to junior colleagues. For women, obtaining a strong mentor is a crucial part of advancing their careers in a male-dominated field. There is no strict formula or instructions for mentorship, and scientific mentors can serve a variety of roles. A mentor may be someone who helps you prepare for a presentation or provides guidance in achieving work-life balance. Mentors may provide advice on a range of personal to professional concerns or obstacles.

To highlight the invaluable colleagues who support and inspire us, we created the WiSE Mentorship Awards. These two awards – one for Faculty/Administrator level mentors and one for Graduate Student/Post-Doc level mentors –  serve to honor individuals, both male and female, who have served as personal or professional mentors to women here at CSHL. Awards are given every two years.

Photos by Jue Xiang


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